Archive for January 26th, 2010

The culture of the Web

Today we covered some of the basics of Web 2.0—how the tools of the internet have changed, and why that’s significant for the creation and circulation of media content (of all kinds, not just journalism).

On Thursday we complete the circle with a discussion of how these tools get bound up in a particular cultural ethic—in other words, a “digital culture.” We find this in two pieces I’d like you to read: the first chapters of “Convergence Culture” by Henry Jenkins and “Media Work” by Mark Deuze (in that order). I’ve put both PDFs on Blackboard for you.

You can catch Jenkins discussing more of his work here, or visit his blog. For Deuze, check out his blog, read this interview, or watch a clip of Deuze discussing his research:

As you read Jenkins, I’d like you to ask: What does the blending of production and consumption, of professional and amateur, through the digitization of media and the tensions that creates … well, what does it all mean, exactly? What does it mean for media industries at large? Journalism in particular?

As you read Deuze, think: What is the present and future of working in/with the media? How does work, play, and “life” get mixed together in today’s world, and what are the implications of this change?

Deuze writes in the preface: “The aim of the book is not only to prepare media students to become competent media practitioners, but to also enable students to become competent citizens in a media-saturated ‘hyper-reality,’ where meaningful distinctions between public and private life, work time and non-work time, local and global, or lived and mediated reality are fading.”

In other words, knowing how to function in this digital culture is going to be essential going forward—whether or not you plan to work in the media industries. The key takeaway here is that we need to understand what it means to have “cultural competency” in this digital culture. Do news organizations have that kind of cultural capital? Why or why not?

A few additional questions to get you thinking, on both readings:

—What is convergence culture? What is digital culture? Are we talking about the same thing, or not?

—What does it mean to develop relationships with media? Where does the “real” end and the virtual begin?

—What is the emerging “workstyle” for the digital media worker, and how do you feel about it?

—What does it mean to be connected and have a sense of community in today’s media experience?

All in all, think of how digital media and culture are changing (or not) your own life and the future of our field. I look forward to your responses for Thursday. And … bear in mind that I’d like you to be analytical—that you should approach this with the eye of a critic, forming an opinion about what you’ve read and using evidence from the reading to illustrate your point. Sharp thinking.

Questions? Just let me know…


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