Liveblogging my lecture

Imagine you were reporting this “event” for people outside. What would they want to know from this lecture? Give us some rapid-fire comments on what strikes you as interesting, and comment on the questions/ideas/reactions raised by your classmates along the way. … Now, go crash WordPress’ servers.

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191 Responses to “Liveblogging my lecture”


  1. 1 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:35 am

    9/17 Live Blog on State of the News Media:

    We need jobs! Are there jobs! Where is journalism going?!

  2. 2 Raquel September 17, 2008 at 9:35 am

    Professor Lewis discussed the job market for journalists. He questioned the emerging forms of journalism and what effects these technologies will have on the profession.

  3. 3 pieper12 September 17, 2008 at 9:35 am

    We’re starting the lecture on career paths with the “emerging forms of journalism” and the pending “crisis” we are enduring.. A heavy topic that we are all having to deal with and it sometimes just sucks and can be scary!

  4. 4 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:36 am

    The statistics for newspaper circulation are NOT looking good – fewer readers, but more people? How can we engage people again?

  5. 5 Mollie B. September 17, 2008 at 9:36 am

    Professor Seth Lewis lectures on the changes in the news media industry and what it means for the future of journalism.

  6. 6 Raquel September 17, 2008 at 9:36 am

    About newspaper circulation: yes, people read less. But what makes things worse is that there are more people, population has grown 50%, but circulation has gone down. This is terrible.

  7. 7 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:36 am

    what does the shake up in journalism mean for the future of the field? For our futures? It’s depressing…

    The population is up, but readers are down. Adjusted loss: 74%

  8. 8 jeffbechdel September 17, 2008 at 9:37 am

    Stats from Vin Crosbie (Bing’s brother?) reveal the same depressing news as many other J-classes have. More people, less readers. “We’re going to Hell in a handbasket” has not been uttered, however. Yet.

  9. 9 Holley N September 17, 2008 at 9:37 am

    We all have to graduate at some point and get jobs. The news industry is changing, so what does this mean for students who are trying to break into the field?

    Fact: Newspaper readership is down. The U.S. population has grown, but newspaper readership is declining.

  10. 10 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:37 am

    Newspaper penetration: the amount of people a newspaper reaches (it doesn’t just reach the people who buy it; people can pass it around among their families and friends.)

  11. 11 Brittany September 17, 2008 at 9:37 am

    The State of the News Media.

    The state of the news media is pretty depressing, with circulation at its lowest level since 1946. Even more troubling is the fact that there are 50 percent more people now than in 1946. Essentially the adjusted loss is 74 percent.

  12. 12 Caroline Page September 17, 2008 at 9:37 am

    What is the landscape of the news media like?

    – Circulation is at its lowest level since 1946, which as an aspiring journalist, is discouraging!
    – There are more people – 50% population increase – at this time in our world, but circulation has decreased. Is it because newspapers are become old-fashioned and dated, or is the media looked at so negatively people don’t want to read the news?

  13. 13 Mollie B. September 17, 2008 at 9:38 am

    Newspaper penetration has been reduced dramatically and newspaper industries are left trying to find new ways to generate revenue.

  14. 14 Jane Kim September 17, 2008 at 9:38 am

    Professor Lewis stressed that the adjusted loss of circulation of news in 2008 is 74%. That is a massive number. Hopefully the future is brighter for online news.

  15. 15 pieper12 September 17, 2008 at 9:38 am

    Seth is giving us numbers about the average losses for newspaper circulation. He says that right now is the lowest time for circulation since 1946! Also, penetration is almost half of what it was; therefore revenue for newspapers has taken some huge cuts.

    Revenue is going down 6-10% for newspapers and is only getting worse.

  16. 16 Caroline Page September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    – the revenue of newspapers took the lowest dip in 60 years in 2007…

    What percentage does online make up for that?
    – people don’t have to subscribe to online sites, but advertising brings in revenue
    – however in the past 6 months there has been a decline in online advertising revenue – not good for journalists!

  17. 17 Raquel September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    Newspapers as business are no longer paying. Revenue is down both in subscription and advertising, but online the revenue is limited just to advertising. Although online advertising revenue had spiked, right now it’s declining.

  18. 18 pieper12 September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    Now, online is growing and the only way they make revenue is from advertising. In the past 6 months or so, online advertising revenue seems to be flattening.

  19. 19 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    bottom line: MONEY. The newspaper industry is losing it at a rate of 6-10% a year. Online changes things… advertising only accounts for 8% ,though, and this rate is declining as well.
    Note to self: Find a NFL player to marry…
    jk 🙂

  20. 20 Holley N September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    Newspapers have suffered a huge loss. This year it is looking even worse for the newspaper industry, and the future doesn’t look so hot either. And, although we thought the online world would solve our problems because ad revenue was doing pretty well for awhile, now that revenue is also in decline.

  21. 21 Brittany September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    Job market not looking good…newspaper revenue saw sharpest decline in 60 years in 2007. Why aren’t people buying newspapers?

  22. 22 jeffbechdel September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    The revenue rate for newspapers is dropping 6-10% per year. Not only that, it’s getting worse–2007 was a really bad year, but “the decline is steepening,” likely making 2008 an even worse year. Long story short, the advertising-journalism model has not adjusted. Online revenue is not enough to sustain these publications. But, a light at the end of the tunnel, by 2040 the online revenue might equal the print revenue. Hooray!

  23. 23 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    Online revenue will take years to equal print revenue; print may not even exist anymore at that point.

  24. 24 Jane Kim September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    Online accounts create no subscription revenue at all, but mostly creates revenue from ads. This might mean that news publications will be more dependent on advertising agencies and their focus will be more on marketing, rather than news.

  25. 25 Mollie B. September 17, 2008 at 9:40 am

    Online can’t make up for subscription revenue, so it has to bring in revenue from advertising. However, now there’s also a flat-lining of online revenue from advertising. All these things lead to a decline in market value for newspapers.

  26. 26 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:42 am

    Investors in newspaper companies are asking: where is the money? Many are selling off stocks at incredible rates.

  27. 27 jeffbechdel September 17, 2008 at 9:42 am

    Major newspaper companies are listed on the NYSE, fluctuating up and down. Some publications, however, are not. Those that are public are seeing serious concern from investors, who are selling off at “incredible rates.”

  28. 28 Laura C. September 17, 2008 at 9:42 am

    State of the News Media:

    Newspaper circulation is down, not very many people getting their news from hard copy newspapers… duh. I’m an eco-friendly girl, and I think this is cool that we don’t waste paper, BUT… people need to be getting their news ONLINE or on television. Just because you don’t get the newspaper doesn’t mean you don’t get the news.

    This relates to huge cuts in newspaper revenue, meaning cuts in jobs. How are newspapers going to make money online, so we can keep enough reporters around to report? Are we going to start seeing product placement in articles? I hope not.

  29. 29 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:42 am

    Market value: price of stock times the number of stock. Most newspaper companies are publicly traded companies Investors are pissed now because they arent making enough money, and they are selling their sticks. Value fell 23 billion in JUST the first quarter of this year. This is killin me. us.

  30. 30 Mollie B. September 17, 2008 at 9:43 am

    Most major newspapers are publicly traded companies. The value of some of the top newspapers have declined already at the start of 2008.

  31. 31 pieper12 September 17, 2008 at 9:43 am

    In the first HALF of this year, the value of the top 11 public newspapers fell $23 BILLION! Hmmm.. no bueno!

  32. 32 Laura C. September 17, 2008 at 9:43 am

    Market share values are down… everything is down right now.

  33. 33 Jane Kim September 17, 2008 at 9:43 am

    The market value of 11 top public newspaper companies fell $23 billion just in the first half of 2008. How will the newspapers sustain their business? Their needs to be a revolutionary means of creating online revenue and generating new interest in hard news, without hurting the circulation and traffic they gain by letting their content be free.

  34. 34 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:43 am

    **selling their stocks

  35. 35 Brittany September 17, 2008 at 9:43 am

    Investors have been punishing newspapers, selling their stocks at fast rate. Surprise, surprise, newspapers aren’t worth much these days.

  36. 36 Holley N September 17, 2008 at 9:43 am

    There are a few private newspaper companies that are not really impacted by the stock market. However, for most major newspapers, this is not the case– they are publicly traded, and the stock market hits these papers big time.

  37. 37 Raquel September 17, 2008 at 9:43 am

    Decline in circulation and in revenue weakens the market value of newspaper businesses. Most newspaper companies are publicly traded, and investors are wondering where their money is. Newspapers are getting it. The value of newspapers since 2004 has devalued by half.

  38. 38 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:44 am

    anyone wanna change their major? I’m thinking med school maybe?

  39. 39 Caroline Page September 17, 2008 at 9:44 am

    What is market value? what the paper adds to the economy, stocks, trade, investors, etc.

    = basically the price of the stock x number of stock

    – many major newspaper in US are publicaly traded companies and investors are wondering where the money has gone –> investors selling off newspaper stocks
    * 11 top public newspaper companies fell $23 billion in first half of 2008: down 50% since 2004
    – at one point newspaper stocks were worth $63, currently $3.19

    – there are some private newspaper companies – don’t release figures and privately held, therefore not as affected by the market and don’t contribute to economy

  40. 40 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:44 am

    McClatchy stock over the last five years has absolutely plummeted. This is just one example of what newspapers are facing.

  41. 41 jeffbechdel September 17, 2008 at 9:45 am

    Prof. Lewis is now showing a lovely image of the Rocky Mountains. No, wait, scratch that. It’s a chart of McClatchy stock. Look out below!

  42. 42 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:46 am

    some newspapers are privatized from the stock market, but the credit crunch is hurting them.

  43. 43 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:46 am

    Private ownership hasn’t saved the industry, because the credit crunch going on makes it more difficult to get a loan today, for individuals and businesses.

  44. 44 Holley N September 17, 2008 at 9:46 am

    At google finance you can really see how these major news companies are faring in the stock market. So, the market value of these major newspapers is also going down. We need some good news!!!…some of the private papers are somewhat insulated from the stock market.

  45. 45 Brittany September 17, 2008 at 9:46 am

    Theme of the day: down. Everything is down. Readership, circulation, stock value, jobs. Prozac, anyone?

  46. 46 Jane Kim September 17, 2008 at 9:46 am

    McClatchy’s market value is down 95% from $63 in 2005 to $3.19 today. It’s value continually falls every hour.

  47. 47 Raquel September 17, 2008 at 9:46 am

    McClatchy, Lee, NYTimes, Gannett, they’ve all gone down. And the credit-crunch situation has made it hard for people to get loans, which creates greater problems for private newspaper companies.

  48. 48 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:46 am

    2,185 jobs were lost in 2007; so far in 2008, that number has jumped to 8,118 jobs lost.

  49. 49 Mollie B. September 17, 2008 at 9:46 am

    The credit crunch of today has made it a lot harder to get loans. What does it all mean for jobs? So far in 2008, 8,000 jobs have been lost this year. That’s scary.

  50. 50 Laura C. September 17, 2008 at 9:47 am

    “a Dire picture” of newsroom jobs.

    Dire is an understatement. 8,118 jobs lost SO FAR in 2008?!

  51. 51 Raquel September 17, 2008 at 9:47 am

    The job loss: 2,185 jobs were lost in 2007, and 8,118 jobs have been lost so far this year.

  52. 52 Caroline Page September 17, 2008 at 9:47 am

    Print Newspaper Jobs
    – 2007: just over 2,000 jobs lost
    – 2008: just over 8,000 jobs lost!!!
    * not all of these are necessarily lay-offs, some are voluntary buy-outs

  53. 53 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:47 am

    There is no such thing as job security in the field of journalism.
    Oh, and by the way, Americans don’t trust the news media.

  54. 54 Jane Kim September 17, 2008 at 9:48 am

    8.118 jobs lost so far in 2008!!! OMG my future as a journalist can’t possibly look any bleaker right now.

  55. 55 Holley N September 17, 2008 at 9:48 am

    OK so it’s looking rough for those in the newspaper business…plus more than half of Americans even believe the media. Oh goodness!!!

  56. 56 Mollie B. September 17, 2008 at 9:48 am

    Newspapers have a lower level of trust too. More and more people claim that they don’t trust the news media anymore. But why? Where did the industry go wrong?

  57. 57 Caroline Page September 17, 2008 at 9:48 am

    Doesn’t help that readers don’t really trust the media and what we’re doing… (maybe I should consider a new career path)

  58. 58 pieper12 September 17, 2008 at 9:48 am

    With all of these things in decline, what does this mean for us-job seekers??

    8,000+ jobs have been lost so far in 2008 and that number will most likely increase in the following years. This is a “dire” situation, Seth says.

    Newspaper is probably not the best market to look at for a career… maybe in their online department?! Let’s hope so!

  59. 59 jeffbechdel September 17, 2008 at 9:48 am

    Finally, we’re to the good stuff. In 2007, roughly 2,100 jobs were lost. But, drumroll please, in 2008 thus far, we’ve lost 8,100 jobs. Prof. Lewis is predicting roughly 12,000 journalism job losses this year, with next year looking worse. But, take heed, many of these are voluntary buy-outs, not necessarily job losses. So, please, continue uncorking the bubbly.

  60. 60 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:48 am

    The news is not shrinking; there is actually more news than ever. The online news audience is larger than the print audience. Through linking, people can explore news much more freely than ever before.

  61. 61 Laura C. September 17, 2008 at 9:48 am

    More news than ever? Who are we going to get to report this, if you can’t hire journalists? More citizen journalists… living off trust funds? I don’t know about you, but even though I love to break a story, I also love living in a house, and not in a box. I gotta have some income.

  62. 62 Jane Kim September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    Come on.. Give us SOME freakin’ hope..

  63. 63 Briana C September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    We have more venues for news than ever, but is news shrinking? *Power of the link
    *Online news media audience
    *Anyone can be a news source thanks to the internet

  64. 64 Brittany September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    More than half of Americans do not trust the media. What can we do in the future to regain people’s trust? Is that even possible?

  65. 65 Caroline Page September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    There is more news in the world today than ever, but more “ordinary” people are contributing to news, but not in print.

  66. 66 Holley N September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    53 million people create content online beyond e-mail, so people are still interested in news, just not the actual printed word.

  67. 67 Caitlin W September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    People *are* engaging in the news; just, not in print!

  68. 68 Mollie B. September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    News is still out there, but people are finding it in other ways.

  69. 69 Raquel September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    People’s distrust in the media doesn’t help the profession.

    Aside from all these circulation and business problems, news itself has not stopped. The online audience is greater than the print audience, which means people are reading. And not only reading, but writing too. 53 million people create content according to the Pew Research Center.

    “So news is out there and people are still engaging in it, but not in print,” said professor Lewis.

  70. 70 Jane Kim September 17, 2008 at 9:49 am

    Ok.. so news is still out there and more and more people are interacting with it.. but just online, not print. So hopefully multimedia is the way to go.

  71. 71 pieper12 September 17, 2008 at 9:50 am

    We’re wrapping up to day…stay tuned for another depressing one Friday!

  72. 72 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:04 am

    Craigslist has had an incredible impact on Classified advertising. If newspapers had been so innovative, they could have profited.

  73. 73 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:04 am

    We’re back for round two. So what is causing the trouble with media companies? They missed the idea of research and development.

  74. 74 Laura C. September 19, 2008 at 9:05 am

    Eh, it’s not THAT depressing.

  75. 75 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:05 am

    In the past, newspapers functioned more like monopolies. Thus, newspapers didn’t NEED to invest in research and development, so they didn’t.

  76. 76 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:05 am

    Causes and culprits of this journalism downturn? Craig’s list among them – decimating traditional classified ads.

  77. 77 Laura C. September 19, 2008 at 9:05 am

    I agree Caitlin. Craig’s List is such an awesome thing and newspapers should have thought of that!

  78. 78 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:05 am

    Major newspapers have been monopolies, owning the market (aside from radio and television). Thus, very little has been done in terms of research and development–that’s why they’re currently lagging behind.

  79. 79 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:06 am

    So what are the causes & culprits of the downfall of print journalism?
    Professor Lewis says that before, the major news companies were monopolies, and since they controlled the industry already, they had no motivation to research and innovate the industry.

  80. 80 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:06 am

    The media has such a monopoly that they do not HAVE to invest in research and development. A lot of things factor in though, not just failure to invest.

  81. 81 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:06 am

    If you notice, in the past 40 years newspapers were big monopolies. Who could compete against them? Now, it’s the internet. And many of these companies have failed to do research and development for the industry.

  82. 82 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:06 am

    So what are the causes/culprits to this change in the news media industry? The internet? Craig’s list? Monopolies? Society? Nobody?

    Over years newspapers haven’t done as much to research the changes in the industry. If they had they might have been able to adjust to this shift from print to multimedia.

  83. 83 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:06 am

    So how does this impact the field of journalism? Some argue we are simply getting more of the same thing online from media companies.

  84. 84 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:07 am

    I heard UT advertising is conducting a research on the marketplace on Facebook, which acts like Craigslist but connects people more. Maybe Facebook could be a way to connect journalists and readers more.

  85. 85 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:07 am

    Newspapers have closed down many international bureaus.

  86. 86 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:07 am

    What a cool idea, Jane! Certainly, I think Facebook could be an “in” for newspapers to get to a younger crowd.

  87. 87 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:08 am

    The way things are now, we have the opportunity for stronger journalism that digs deeper into the facts.

  88. 88 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:08 am

    Professor Lewis discusses the impact of online news. Are they more or less involved, do they cover more local or more international news, do they have more or fewer opportunities?

    This is an opportunity for more voices to become involved directly with the news online by being able to comment on stories, blog, etc.

  89. 89 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:08 am

    There are more perspectives out there in this new journalism world, but are we hearing/seeing the same things over and over? We have more space with the internet to create more news. What kind of news will we create?

  90. 90 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:08 am

    So what has been the impact? Are we less or more informed these days?

    Example: the LA Times tried to expand and become an international newspaper and invested their money in bureaus, when really they should have left their focus on LA.

  91. 91 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:08 am

    This allows for more voices to be heard, for journalism to be strengthened. Newspapers are old now, who’s reading them?

    But there is hope. This is a time of opportunity.

  92. 92 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:08 am

    Example: The LA Times turned itself into an international publication and thinned themselves out. They could have had better coverage by focusing resources on national and local news and using correspondents from other publications to fill out their paper.

    It seems like this is maybe a clue into our current situation—what should publications be focusing on in their online formats?

  93. 93 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:09 am

    There’s hope for us! What are our new opportunities? Omnimedia, for one – in other words, a news organization is everywhere, in whatever form people want.

  94. 94 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:09 am

    Here comes the hope…THANK GOODNESS! YAY GOOD NEWS! We, as journalism students, have a vast number of great opportunities–the digital domain: Omni-media- everywhere and anywhere you want to receive the news, it’s there.

  95. 95 Laura C. September 19, 2008 at 9:09 am

    “Omnimedia” – scary sounding, but actually cool. MAYBE people will start getting informed?

  96. 96 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:10 am

    Omnimedia was a new term for me. I think it’s very appropriate since the border between radio, video and print is blurring and all kinds of media converge together.

  97. 97 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:10 am

    However, there are some good opportunities for those of us who will soon graduate from journalism school (YAY!).

    There are more opportunities now to be collaborative, independent from major industries, networked, moblie, more people oriented, and to be platform for the community.

  98. 98 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:10 am

    Journalism can become more social, and touch people in a more personal way than everywhere before. The idea is that we all can have our own printing press.

  99. 99 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:10 am

    The opportunity exists for all kinds of people to get involved in journalism, but does anyone feel like there are TOO many people out there trying to act as journalists?

  100. 100 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:10 am

    Some of the opportunities of the internet are:
    -media is everywhere
    -opportunity to collaborate, to have co-creators out there
    -networked journalism, using a variety of perspectives to help inform
    -news can be more people-oriented, can touch YOU more personally ?
    -tools are free
    -create communities beyond the boundaries of physical spaces

  101. 101 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:11 am

    Media has new opportunities, including independent, networked, live and social formats and avenues to give readers the news in different ways.

  102. 102 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:11 am

    How about some new opportunities in the digital domain?

    1. Omnimedia- easier to access
    2. Collaborative- many different outlets to add to mix
    3. Independent
    4. Networked- variety of perspectives to broaden news
    5. Mobile!
    6. A ton of cheap, easy, mostly free tools to use!

    All of these things help create a community that goes beyond the boundaries of traditional news models.

  103. 103 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:11 am

    Dear Brittany,
    Yes. Yes, I do.
    Sincerely,
    Jeff

  104. 104 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:12 am

    – the press used to act as the gatekeepers and the public couldn’t survive without us?
    – so we know the world needs journalists and journalism, but do they need journalists in their present form?

  105. 105 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:12 am

    Brittany – it’s definitely a little scary to think we have been paying tuition to go to school and take courses to become professional journalists, when there are others just starting up and reporting without training. I think we can look at it positively, though – issues that were buried before, that didn’t get any space in paper format, can be brought to light, and then *we* can research them and report on them formally and get things to change. I think we’ll still be necessary, because we’ll have access to resources the “normal” citizen journalist would not.

  106. 106 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:12 am

    One of the criticisms of journalists is that we tend to think we are the center of the universe and we believe that the public would not get the information they need.
    Certainly they need good journalists, but do they need them in the form that exists now?
    Then what is the new way we should think?

  107. 107 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:13 am

    The old model: The world was filtered through the press & then disseminated to us. It’s the mentality that without the press, the public would be uninformed, and thus fail to survive. But, the traditional linear model (with little feedback,) is not how we live. In reality we live in the “me-sphere.” We are influenced by a number of sources all around us.

  108. 108 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:13 am

    I am not alone! Thanks, Jeff.

  109. 109 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:13 am

    The new press-sphere is a more collaborative multi-perspective process.

  110. 110 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:13 am

    News production is no longer linear! We have to focus on the process instead of the product.

  111. 111 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:13 am

    Prof. Lewis goes back to the traditional way:

    The world–> The press –> us. (The way it was)

    It was pretty linear and lacked feedback…Well, times have definitely changed!

    Now, we observe the “Me-Sphere” and the “Press-Sphere”
    Ex: Companies, government, me, observers, witnesses. There are so many more aspects that go into journalism today.

  112. 112 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:13 am

    Old structure of news: press as gatekeeper, the connection between the world and us. It’s kind of an egocentric perspective because it makes journalists the center of the issue, that without them this information wouldn’t get out

    New structure of news: the “me-sphere”, in which we’re surrounded by media, search companies, links, press… life functions in a non-linear way

    There could be a “press-sphere”, a collaborative open-source project. Changing the thought of the press as linear to non-linear… comments, photos, developments

  113. 113 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:14 am

    The “new” model of how news gets to us is much less clear cut (i.e. linear) and is now multi-perspectival. So much is feeding into the story now, that I wonder if everything that’s IMPORTANT is getting in the news, and not just the flashy things that people prefer.

  114. 114 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:14 am

    Online news is much more of a process than a product. A newspaper is a product.

  115. 115 Samantha G. September 19, 2008 at 9:14 am

    news is non linear… a story comes from multiple contributors.

  116. 116 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:14 am

    the old model for news:
    the world–> the press–> us
    So there was a sense that the press “owned” the information.

    new model of news:
    “the me-sphere”–> our lives function in a non-linear way and we are surrounded by many different influences.
    so the new “press-sphere” is similar — stories can incorporate different things,like photos, videos, opportunities for comment, etc.

  117. 117 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:15 am

    New news process – continuous. Online news isn’t a product anymore, but a process. The constant motion of online news changes the landscape completely.

  118. 118 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:15 am

    – Press-sphere: press is part of the non-linear sphere we live in, but it’s much more collaborative
    – the new news process is continuous –> online news can actually be more of a process than a product
    – online news is never really finished – very much unlike the way print has operated forever

  119. 119 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:15 am

    I worry about that, too, Jeff. I worry people are getting their news in a kind of vacuum.

  120. 120 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:15 am

    I think that’s one aspect I kind of like about online journalism. A story isn’t just some sensational story that’s on our minds for one day and then it’s done with. People can add to the story and discuss the issues they raise. They can find more stories that tie into the story, and the possibilities are just endless.
    It’s awesome.

  121. 121 Laura C. September 19, 2008 at 9:15 am

    No more “product”?

    It is hard for people to understand the shift from a hard copy newspaper to the digital world that is the internet.

    I think what will happen is our generation can understand this better, and as we enter the workforce and replace the old fogeys (haha), people will start to accept the digitalized news.

  122. 122 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:15 am

    OK…so we have a new news process that is more of an ongoing PROCESS, rather than a product. Here’s the problem with newspapers, they are a product. The stories never change, they are printed, “fixed” stories. However, with this online world, we are able to carry the story on & on. It has links, corrections, and comments from readers.

  123. 123 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:16 am

    The new news process– the story is no longer a product, but more of a process now. With the internet we can incorporate into our stories discussion, links, corrections, comment, and followup.

  124. 124 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:16 am

    New News Process

    Online, news is more a process than a product.

    Getting your newspaper every morning was fixed, linear. What you got was it for that day.

    Online, the discussion never ends. People can make corrections within the story. Time can be used more productively.

  125. 125 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:17 am

    In the new model, the entire right-hand side of the model, which includes links, corrections (to a degree–it’s much easier now) comments and follow up, is new. This end is largely interactive. It’s not linear, but circular.

  126. 126 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:17 am

    Many online news sources enable more viewers to log in and assist in editing stories, like in Wikipedia.

  127. 127 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:17 am

    Think in non-linear terms. Think in circular, ever-expanding cycle.

  128. 128 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:17 am

    What if anyone could go online and fix a typo on the NYT, just as you can do for Wikipedia?!?
    – vs the way corrections are run days later on page 2 in print

  129. 129 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:17 am

    People can now contribute more than ever before, and this is what newspapers have to adapt to. They have to know what to do with this new continuous flow of feedback from readers/viewers.

  130. 130 Samantha G. September 19, 2008 at 9:18 am

    in the past news papers came out and were “fixed,” where as on line it’s never finished.

    Were as when there are corrections online they can be made within the story etc… News is made more clear.

  131. 131 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:18 am

    “Do what you do best, and link to the rest.” – Brilliant! This is another way where the most important stories could really be able to get through to people.

  132. 132 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:18 am

    I think it will be interesting that 50 years later, we could look back and look at a story, and we will be able to see what the people actually thought about that story at that time.
    A lot of time when I read history, I have wondered what the people were thinking when those historical events actually happened.
    Now people will be able to know.

  133. 133 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:19 am

    “Do what you do best, link to the rest.” I think this is a great concept, but I think since newspapers really want to be, and traditionally have been, everything to everybody, it’s hard for them to accept this new model.

  134. 134 Samantha G. September 19, 2008 at 9:19 am

    What does the Austin American Statesman do best?

  135. 135 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:19 am

    “Do what you do best and link to the rest” – Jeff Jarvis

    – if news organizations used this as a guideline it would change the way they operate
    – instead of doing everything, the news org could think “what do we do best?” and then link to other people who are experts… very interesting way of thinking about news structure

  136. 136 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:19 am

    “Do what you do best, and link to the rest.”

    Maybe newspapers now should take a look at what they do best, and not try to be everything to everybody.

  137. 137 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:19 am

    “Do what you do best, link to the rest.” By far the best information I’ve heard on a Friday morning at 9 a.m.

    But does this work for someone like the New York Times? Aren’t they “the best” at everything? I’d be willing to bet that the NYT and Wash Post (still) rarely link to one another.

  138. 138 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:19 am

    Essence of this new structures: Links.

    It is time for news organizations to figure out what they do best and how they can link to the rest.
    This tactic would help save a lot more time and would enable the news organization to enhance on their true assets.

  139. 139 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:19 am

    “Do what you do best, and link to the rest.” – Jeff Jarvis

    If newspapers adopted this as their motto, the industry would be better. If news organizations focused on what they did best, and linked to the rest, they could become more efficient.

  140. 140 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:20 am

    Linking could make the Internet harder to navigate though. People just quote stuff and link sites like crazy that they all become interlinked, and when you search you come up with so much of the same things over and over again.
    I think linking too much could become a problem too.

  141. 141 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:20 am

    I think Jane makes a really good point above, about being able to look back at stories, years down the road, and discover what people where thinking about the story at the time. I think this is a priceless thing the web has offered us.

  142. 142 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:20 am

    Diamond model of writing – building upon the inverted pyramid but adding links and outsourcing content.

  143. 143 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:21 am

    That’s true, Jane; I usually won’t click out of a website because too many pages pop up, or I navigate away from the story I actually wanted to read.

  144. 144 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:21 am

    This all kind of makes me a little sad. I am all for the awesomeness of the internet and easy accessibility of news and info, but I have major nostalgia for the print product, that thing you can hold in your hand (sorry though about paper wasting, Laura. I do recycle!).

  145. 145 Samantha G. September 19, 2008 at 9:21 am

    I love that we have the ability to “link to the rest” at this point.. it cuts out a lot of redundancy.

  146. 146 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:21 am

    “How do you get news about the election?” –if the news is important it will find me.

    I do not like this. Pure laziness.

  147. 147 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:22 am

    Prof. Lewis gives an example of how news travels and how we should cater to that: One guy who was asked how he finds his news, said that “if the news is important, it will find me.” …He needs an RSS feed to a news source!

  148. 148 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:22 am

    How do young people get news about the election?
    – “if the news is important, it will find me” –> typical of the lazy attitude people our age have today…
    – “someone will just email it to me if it’s important” vs. “i want to seek out the significant events going on in the world”

  149. 149 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:23 am

    Linking could make journalists become lazy, too. They could start omitting doing research themselves and just link to stuff. Would that really be good journalism? And I also doubt that a lot of people would actually go to those other sites to research the issue thoroughly.

  150. 150 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:23 am

    If news organizations are effective, they will package news in such a way that it is easy to be distributed. I think Prof. Lewis makes a great point that what if the Statesman had come up with an application that essentially does the same thing as google.

  151. 151 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:24 am

    So how do we earn money?

    Content economy vs. the Link economy.
    I create content and people pay for it vs. doing what you do best and linking to the rest.

    And if you are getting traffic because of your links, you need to figure out how to make money with that.

  152. 152 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:24 am

    Though I typically get the news online, sometimes I do just want to pick up a paper and hold it in my hands and read it. Sometimes with the internet I feel a bit overwhelmed by everything coming at me at once and I turn away from it. I guess it can be like an information overload.

  153. 153 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:24 am

    haha. That makes me feel kind of guilty. I am one of those people who think the important news will find me.
    It actually does, most of the time.
    hmm..
    There’s just so much crap out there that it’s discouraging some time.

  154. 154 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:24 am

    – news economy:
    – if you want to survive today, you have to become more adaptive, responsice

  155. 155 Samantha G. September 19, 2008 at 9:24 am

    Small is the new big! Process over product people!

  156. 156 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:24 am

    Small is the new big, process is the new product.

  157. 157 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:24 am

    Content Economy: (Old) I create content, and people-advertisers- pay for it. (Newer) I provide content, and provide links to the rest.

    News organizations need to be flexible and be able to adapt to changes, since they are very real!

  158. 158 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:24 am

    God I hope I can get a job when I graduate…lol

  159. 159 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:25 am

    I second Mollie.

  160. 160 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:25 am

    So how do we make the cash?
    How do we get a job?
    Reality: Tough to get a traditional news job.
    Good news: There’s still room for reporters and producers.

  161. 161 Laura C. September 19, 2008 at 9:25 am

    New jobs – web-centered jobs.

    I’m definitely wanting to get in on these! I think we all need Photoshop, Final Cut Pro, Dreamweaver, HTML skills for starters.

  162. 162 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:25 am

    Multimedia producers are going to be essential in this new world of journalism!

  163. 163 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:26 am

    Develop adaptability and flexibility, but will we have a job when we graduate?

    The traditional office job of the reporter will be gone, but what’s coming up are multimedia jobs. Reporters that go out and film, edit and upload.

  164. 164 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:26 am

    Jane, re: will it make journalists lazy, too?

    I don’t think it will, but obviously this is just my opinion. Personally, when I go from one site to another through related links, it makes me want to read/write more. As I become more informed, I have more to say. I would hope that that type of view would lead to more investigative and analysis journalism.

  165. 165 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:26 am

    Possibly a new need for multimedia producers who can get footage, a story and put together a package.

  166. 166 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:27 am

    New jobs in journalism include programmers and developers. So why doesn’t UT support this???
    It is impossible to get any kind of real education in web programming in UT, and I believe it is essential in this stage of multimedia.
    We can’t just stand by and say,’oh well.. I’m a journalist.. so I’ll learn how to put things on the web but I don’t think I need to know any more than that..”
    No. We need to learn programming.

  167. 167 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:27 am

    Ah, back to money and the ultimate question – can I get a job?

    Supposedly there are still a lot of opportunities out there, particularly for multimedia people. Copy editors still necessary as their role shifts from editing for print to editing for web.

  168. 168 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:27 am

    Role of copy editors have shifted to online editors, though this idea is in conflict with the Web 2.0 possibility of editing done by the general population.

  169. 169 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:27 am

    If you want to be a copy editor…well the job is dramatically changing. In the traditional sense, it is a dying job, but they are shifting toward hybrid roles. There will still be a need for editors, but the job description will change a lot.

  170. 170 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:28 am

    I agree with Laura and Jane. We desperately need to learn how to program.

  171. 171 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:28 am

    How do you manage this endless ocean of information? That’s where curators of information come in, knows how to manage information in an effective way.

  172. 172 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:28 am

    So, what the heck are we supposed to do as journalist students?

    – there will always be a need for reporters… thankfully
    – multimedia – obvious one, but on top of this, jobs available for people to collect the raw video that comes in from cameramen off site and put it in a package
    – copyeditor – people have found that online editors were glorified copy editors so this job is shifting today; might be a dying position bc so many people have the ability to edit today
    – curator of information – how can we manage all of this vast information?

  173. 173 Samantha G. September 19, 2008 at 9:29 am

    Thank god, there will be an increasing need for multimedia producers…

    I think their are many news jobs that are becoming less one dimensional and that multimedia skills are necessary for nearly all of them.

    I’m glad I’m in this class.

  174. 174 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:29 am

    What we need: Community Organizers. We have to get people involved.

  175. 175 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:30 am

    News organizations need people who “get” the web. Definitely a plus for us in this class.

  176. 176 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:30 am

    Again, in order to create innovative ways to manage information through the web, we need to know programming so that we know what tools we have.

  177. 177 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:30 am

    Sooo what does it look like for us?

    There are still needs for certain positions:

    – Reporter
    – ** Increasing need for Multimedia Producers who can speak in “code” and who can take raw material and be able to work with it and be able to put it online.
    – Copy Editors are shifting to the role of editing for the print and web versions. There’s still a need, but the work that they do will most likely be changing with regards to the amount of viewers who can edit stories themselves online.
    – Curator, someone who can effectively manage information.
    – Community Organizer, someone who can get folks interested and involved.
    – Programmer/ Developer, there’s a lot of room right now to become innovation-minded and who “get the web.” There are still alot of newsrooms who are dealing with older structures and they need a fresh outlook.

  178. 178 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:30 am

    Major newspapers are willing to hire college graduates who have new ideas, skills. But “knowing what good journalism is” is still at the heart of the job.

  179. 179 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:30 am

    We are at an advantage as young people who have received fresh current education because there are older traditionalists in news rooms that need great smart people like us to help people to evolve?!?

  180. 180 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:30 am

    The work of a journalist has really moved to someone who can organize, be flexible and try new things.

  181. 181 Raquel September 19, 2008 at 9:31 am

    The role of journalist, like before, is to facilitate and organize but in the new online model. Journalistic ethics and values are still relevant, but we have to think out how these will adapt to technology.

  182. 182 Caitlin W September 19, 2008 at 9:31 am

    The move to the web isn’t about a move to soft news – it’s just more local, more personal, and more relevant news. We have to add value to news!

  183. 183 Caroline Page September 19, 2008 at 9:32 am

    How can we apply the core journalism values we’ve learned to today’s world of journalism?
    – embrace change!
    – this doesn’t mean we’re doing “softer” news –> adding value to what we do

  184. 184 Holley N September 19, 2008 at 9:32 am

    Final note: Our “To Do” list.
    Take core values of journalism that we have learned & find a way to apply these to this new media model. It’s all about journalism that matters to people. It’s more local, more relevant to the people we cover.

    Think: What is it we do that brings social value to people?

  185. 185 Samantha G. September 19, 2008 at 9:32 am

    I love trying new things!

    “We need to take our core values and apply them to a new media setting.”

  186. 186 pieper12 September 19, 2008 at 9:32 am

    Finally, what do we need to do?!?

    We need more collaborative, open sources to better the community and help solve their problems. This is not about “fluffy” things, but more local and personal news that is more relevant to the citizens.

    We need to seek what we do that brings value to people, not just monetary, but socially as well!

  187. 187 Brittany September 19, 2008 at 9:32 am

    “What do we do that brings value to people?”

    And ultimately, HAVE FUN.

  188. 188 jeffbechdel September 19, 2008 at 9:32 am

    Recasting journalism’s relationship with the public is by far the most important aspect of this list. That is everything–news permeation, the economics of news, etc.

  189. 189 Jane Kim September 19, 2008 at 9:33 am

    It is important to add value to the news, since there are such an abundance of them that come from multiple sources. How could we create a system that can measure the value of content?

  190. 190 Mollie B. September 19, 2008 at 9:35 am

    How can we better embrace change? How can we recast journalism’s relationship with the public? How can we make it more local and personal? What is the social value of news today?

    Personally, I think the news industry’s/journalism’s relationship with the public is in desperate need of change. I’m tired of people always “blaming the media” and thinking everything they see or read is a bunch of crap. Yes, there are some industries that probably aren’t doing a very good job of earning the trust of the public, and I think that leads people to have a resentment for all other news industries that are actually doing their job right.

  191. 191 Kristin September 19, 2008 at 10:47 pm

    Wow. Sounds like you all figured out quite a bit in two days. Job future=uncertain. So, good thing we’re all learning such versatile information about new tech ideas.


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